No CCTV - campaigning against camera surveillance in the uk and beyond
no cctv

Site Search:

Privacy Protected search  

Latest Reports

 
Latest Articles/News

New mass surveillance database and 1984 action day - more...

The silent increase in London's mass surveillance network, one year on... - more...

Magna Carta - our ancestors never imagined we would stop short - more...

When The Language Of Freedom dies, Freedom Dies With It - more...

Orwell's warnings as relevant as ever - more...

CCTV Looking Out For Them Not You - more...

8th June 2014 - Time For Big Brother to Retire - more...

Body cameras - The 5 Laws of FFUCams - more...

The Manufacture of ''Surveillance by Consent'' part 2 - more...

International Group condemns Facewatch - more...

Landmark CCTV case in Australia - more...

The Manufacture of ''Surveillance by Consent'' - more...

New CCTV Code Consultation - more...

Canadian Privacy Commissioner Hits Out At ANPR - more...

Government appoints CCTV yes man ... again - more...

Open letter to UK Surveillance Regulators - more...

Where to mate? 1984 please - more...

Britain under attack from 'talking' CCTV cameras - more...

Internet Eyes and media politics - more...

Back to the Future - UK CCTV debate stuck in time loop - more...

Royston's ANPR ''Ring of Steel'' - more...

Surveillance Camera Code Con - more...

No CCTV's Freedoms Bill submission - more...

CCTV / ANPR and the Manufacture of Consent - more...

Face Covering: Guest Article - more...

Mr Jolly at Parliamentary Committee - more...

Protection of whose Freedoms Bill? - more...

Exposing Naked Scanners - more...

Bad Boy of the Week - more...

BrumiLeaks, CCTV and democracy - more...

The true cost of CCTV? - more...

ICO's Surveillance Society follow up report - more...

CCTV citizen spy game launches - more...

Freedom not Fear demo in Germany - more...

Speed Cameras, ANPR and Project Columbus - more...

It's not as simple as CCTV cameras or crime - more...

Fox to review Birmingham CCTV chicken coop - more...

Rubbish CCTV - more...

CCTV in tower blocks - more...

Have your say on naked scanners - more...

The Surveillance State will not be beaten at the ballot box - more...

Pre-election warning - more...

CCTV election plege - more...

CCTV Robo-wardens - more...

Naked scanners update - more...

CCTV drones - more...

Naked scanners, naked CCTV and barefaced lies - more...

No CCTV on Red Ice Radio - more...

Scots fast becoming most surveilled in the UK - more...

Government appoints CCTV yes man - more...

BBC runs prime-time advert for CCTV game - more...

CCTV in Scotland: Broken Record - more...

Watch No CCTV's presentation - more...

ICO complaint seeks to halt CCTV game - more...

ANPR - policing by consent? - more...

Intenet Eyes - more...

Project Javelin - more...

Hounslow's ''Promise 10'' - more...

Silly Season, Schools and CCTV - more...

BBC breaches charter - more...

CCTV makes crime go up! - more...

CCTV Agenda creeps forward - more...

ANPR - the expanding network of checkpoints - more...

Proposed bill - CCTV expansion in disguise - more...

Students fight school CCTV - more...

Police's surrealist CCTV poster - more...

Victory in police surveillance case - more...

Study confirms ineffectiveness of CCTV - more...

Google Street Update - more...

Anti-CCTV advertising campaign - more...

Surveillance related consultations - more...

Councils misuse of surveillance - more...

Pub Landlord's CCTV victory - more...

Google takes curtain twitching to a new level - more...

Police admit storing images - more...

Back door CCTV expansion - more...

CCTV in pubs - more...

Modern Liberty Convention - more...

Surveillance report slams CCTV - more...

CCTV case at High Court - more...

Forest Fields Folks Against CCTV - more...

Cowley Road CCTV switched on - more...

Play the CCTV Treasure Hunt - more...

CCTV spies on diners - more...

2009: will decision makers heed CCTV warnings - more...

Beat the recession - cut CCTV - more...

London: In the Kingdom of Big Brother - more...

Update: CCTV sanity in Devon - more...

UK and Iran agree on CCTV and Human Rights - more...

Senior police officer calls for CCTV debate - more...

DPP slams surveillance state - more...

Body cams - more...

Freedom Not Fear - more...

CCTV in schools update - more...

Guilty...until we get the CCTV clock fixed - more...

NO CCTV in L'Express - more...

NO-CCTV finds the plot - more...

CameraWatch call for ''upgrades'' - more...

Blackpool CCTV review - more...

More evidence against CCTV - more...

CCTV industry calls for more cameras - more...

Security expert's CCTV warning - more...

Brown sexes up CCTV - more...

David Davis resigns - more...

China's CCTV laboratory - more...

Halt CCTV expansion - more...

UK surveillance sharing - more...

Cowley Road CCTV delays - more...

National cctv strategy starts to bite - more...

cctv in schools - more...

Police admit crime falling - so why install CCTV? - more...

CCTV sanity in Devon! - more...

cctv is a waste of money - more...

No cctv at oxford radical forum - more...

Victory in police surveillance case at Court of Appeal - 27/5/2009

Andrew Wood has won his landmark case against the Metropolitan Police in the Court of Appeal. The case relates to the police's use of surveillance with regard to law abiding protesters in the UK.

In April 2005 Andrew, who worked for the Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT), attended the Annual General Meeting of Reed Elsevier. As he left the meeting the police followed him, repeatedly photographed him and sought to establish his identity (see our previous blog entry for more details). Andrew took the police to judicial review for their 'routine' surveillance of a person going about their lawful business and engaged in political activity.

The court has now ruled that the police action was in breach of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, the 'Right to respect for private and family life', and specifically 8(1) of the convention: "Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence". The judgment also makes reference to the recent victory for civil liberties in the case of Marper with regards to the retention of innocent peoples' DNA on the National DNA Database.

The judgment states:

On the particular facts the police action, unexplained at the time it happened and carrying as it did the implication that the images would be kept and used, is a sufficient intrusion by the State into the individual's own space, his integrity, as to amount to a prima facie violation of Article 8(1). It attains a sufficient level of seriousness and in the circumstances the appellant enjoyed a reasonable expectation that his privacy would not be thus invaded. Moreover I consider with respect that this conclusion is supported by the judgment of the Strasbourg court in Marper. It will be recalled that the first sentence of paragraph 67 reads:

"The mere storing of data relating to the private life of an individual amounts to an interference within the meaning of Article 8..."

In his closing remarks, Lord Collins of Mapesbury expresses concern about the wider surveillance state and CCTV:

Nevertheless, it is plain that the last word has yet to be said on the implications for civil liberties of the taking and retention of images in the modern surveillance society. This is not the case for the exploration of the wider, and very serious, human rights issues which arise when the State obtains and retains the images of persons who have committed no offence and are not suspected of having committed any offence.

In a recent Guardian article Andrew wrote:

Occasionally people joke "here comes the law" when referring to the police. But the police aren't the law, and they are subject to the law just like you and I. Today a ruling by the court of appeal found the police had broken the law when they undertook a "routine surveillance" operation against Campaign Against Arms Trade in 2005 a period in which I was CAAT's press officer.

[...]

Today's court of appeal ruling maintains that, while the police photography was undertaken in a public place, there was a reasonable expectation of privacy and the photography could not be separated from its use, ie the creation of a police file. The judgment relied on the recent ruling of the European court of human rights regarding the retention of DNA profiles (Marper v UK) and other case law. Today's judgment limits the retention of photographs and other information unless there is a genuine ongoing criminal investigation; there was no crime or further criminal investigation resulting from the AGM of Reed Elsevier in 2005.

At the back of my mind throughout the four years it has taken to reach today's decision was the statement by Richard Thomas, the government's information commissioner, that Britain would "sleep-walk" into a surveillance society. In a very small way, my work and that of my solicitors and barrister Martin Westgate has drawn a line in the sand: the arbitrary retention of people's photographs by the state is wrong, breaches the law and must stop.

More information about the case can be found at www.judicialreview.org.uk.
Read the full judgment at www.bailii.org/cgi-bin/markup.cgi?doc=/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2009/414.html&query=title+(+Wood+)&method=boolean


Posted in Anti-CCTV general - 27/5/2009

email:   rss feed